Feeds

Man charged in DEC hacking case

Unauthorised access

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Build a business case: developing custom apps

A London man has been charged over an alleged attempt to hack into the website of the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC).

Daniel James Cuthbert, 28, of Whitechapel, east London, was charged yesterday with a single offence under Section One of the Computer Misuse Act. He's accused an "unauthorised access" on 31 December to the site of the organisation co-ordinating fundraising efforts to help support victims of the Asian tsunami disaster.

Section One offences, the least serious under the Act, are punishable by up to six months' imprisonment. There's no suggestion any money was stolen and the Disasters Emergency Committee has issued a statement reassuring the public that the internet remains a safe way to donate money to victims of the 26 December disaster.

Cuthbert is scheduled to appear at Horseferry Magistrates Court next Thursday (17 February). ®

Related stories

London man arrested over disaster relief site hack
Fake tsunami appeal website terminated
MPs urged to reform cybercrime laws

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?