Feeds

Intel maps out 64-bit Xeon dash

Pre-IDF elation

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

It doesn't take much for the marketing staff at Intel to go through massive philosophical conversions. A few months back, the PR staffers insisted that customers weren't ready for 64-bit Xeon processors. Now, Intel demands that customers are clamoring for 64-bit choice, which has prompted it to prep two new chips in the Xeon line.

Within the next two weeks, Intel will release a new x86-64-bit Xeon with a 2MB Level 2 cache. The chip will likely clock in at 3.6GHz and will serve as a boost to existing Xeons aimed at workstations and one- to two-processor servers.

Later this quarter, Intel will do even more to bolster the Xeon line by rolling out a 64-bit Xeon aimed at four-processor servers. This Xeon MP will have a 667MHz front side bus, DDR2 support and PCI Express support. This product serves as the predecessor for another Xeon MP chip code-named Potomac that will have an 8MB Level 3 cache.

Intel made a lot of noise this week, announcing dual-core moves with its Pentium desktop processor line. In addition, it said that the first 64-bit Pentium will arrive in the next few weeks. On the server side of the house, Intel revealed the Xeon plans and confirmed its dual-core Itanium processor - known as Montecito - will arrive late this year.

This outpouring of product info comes as surprise given that Intel will hold its developer conference in just three weeks. It typically uses the conference to showcase processor advances.

Intel's marketing staff keeps talking up the high adoption rates of the 64-bit Xeon processors, but we're left wondering why this should be seen as such a big accomplishment. Customers will obviously pick up a product that can run both 32-bit and 64-bit software at speed as opposed to just a 32-bit capable part.

AMD paved the way for x86-64-bit chips, and Intel is now capitalizing off a market its rival helped mature. Had AMD not picked up HP, IBM and Sun Microsystems as customers, Intel's tardiness would not be seen as such a huge loss. Oh well. ®

Related stories

Intel details dual-core Itanium
Intel details dual-core Itanium
AMD takes bigger slice of x86 server market in Q3

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.