Feeds

JK Rowling warns of Harry Potter phishing scam

Be a Muggle, not a mug

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Author JK Rowling this week warned fans of the likelihood of further scams after an offer to sell an e-book version of the next installment of the Harry Potter saga was exposed as a con. A site called www.harrybooks.info (since closed) touted a purported e-book version of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, which is released in July.

But the offer was bogus and designed simply to trick Potter fans in handing over credit card information. Rowling's copyright lawyer, Neil Blair, told Reuters: "They were asking for money and people's credit cards. This was a phishing scam."

The ruse, first reported by Potter fan site The Leaky Cauldron last month, has been nipped in the bud. It's unclear how many people were induced to hand over their credit card info. Rowling advises fans to be on their guard against further scams.

"You should NEVER trust any Harry Potter e-books offered for download from the internet or on P2P/file-trading networks. Setting aside the fact that these books are illegal (there are no authorised HP e-books to date), they may infect your computer with viruses, leave you vulnerable to the dangers of hacking and/or credit card fraud and may also contain content that has nothing to do with Harry Potter, to say the least," Rowling writes on her home page.

"I would bet the original manuscript of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince itself that this will not be the last attempt to con HP fans before the publication of book six on 16 July."

Indeed The Leaky Cauldron reports that an email from "Voldemort" circulating this week that promises fans who follow a number of steps will receive Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince for free is likely another scam. "This is akin to those ads that offer you free iPods and other highly priced items, but first make you jump through a series of Web hoops and spend money before getting to the prize," it warns. ®

Related stories

Harry Potter IP claim pinned down on the beaches
'Potter-mania' fuels spread of NetSky-P
Phishing morphs into pharming
Phishing for dummies: hook, line and sinker

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
KER-CHING! CryptoWall ransomware scam rakes in $1 MEEELLION
Anatomy of the net's most destructive ransomware threat
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.