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AOpen preps second-gen Centrino desktop mobo

Pentium M for low-noise machines

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Motherboard maker AOpen has followed up its recent Pentium M-based desktop board with a new model equipped with the latest generation of Centrino technology.

Like its predecessor, the i915GM-FHS is pitched at desktop machines being developed for low-noise roles, such as living room PCs. The new model uses Intel's 915GM chipset, which supports a 533MHz frontside bus speed Pentium M CPU.

The board relies on the chipset's integrated Graphics Media Accelerator 900 engine for video, but there's a PCI Express x16 slot for the addition a more powerful graphics card. There are x PCI Express x1 slot and a pair of PCI slots for further expansion.

AOpen has included two Serial ATA and two Serial ATA II ports for internal storage, along with an Ultra ATA/100 link. The board provides two DIMM slots, a pair of Gigabit Ethernet ports, two Firewire ports and eight USB 2.0 sockets.

The i915GM-HFS is due to ship early March for around $300. ®

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