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Intel 2.13GHz Pentium M 770 arrives

Top-end 533MHz FSB part appears in Tokyo shops

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Pentium M 770 processors have begun to appear in Tokyo shops today, ahead of tomorrow's formal launch of the 533MHz frontside bus-supporting chips.

The debut, spotted by local site PC Watch, comes a week after other boxed 533MHz FSB Pentium Ms began appearing in the Japanese market.

The PM 770 is clocked at 2.13GHz, Intel's fastest 'Dothan' chip yet. Like the previous top-of-the-range model, the 765, it contains 2MB of on-die L2 cache. The Socket 479 part is intended to work with Intel's 915PM or 915GM chipsets, both members of the 'Alviso' family - the mobile equivalent of its 'Grantsdale' desktop chipset range.

The 770 is priced at around ¥73,535 ($720), but is likely to be formally priced at $637 when it's launched tomorrow. ®

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