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The jury is still out over the safety of mobile phones, radiation boffins have warned today. Although there's no proof to show that they pose a damage to people's health, experts at the UK government-appointed National Radiological Protection Board (NRPD) warned people to continue to take a "precautionary" approach to their use of mobile phones.

In particular, experts are warning that children and other "potentially vulnerable sub-groups" to minimise their exposure to mobile phones amid fears that they could damage health.

In its latest report into the safety of mobile phones the NRPB said today that there is "no hard evidence at present that the health of the public, in general, is being affected adversely by the use of mobile phone technologies, but uncertainties remain and a continued precautionary approach to their use is recommended until the situation is further clarified".

Sir William Stewart, chairman of the NRPB, said that just because almost everyone has a mobile doesn't mean that they are "without potential adverse health effects".

"The fact is that the widespread use of mobile phones is a relatively recent phenomenon and it is possible that adverse health effects could emerge after years of prolonged use. The evidence base necessary to allow us to make firm judgements has not yet been accumulated.

"What we can say is that there is as yet no hard evidence of adverse health effects on the general public, but because of the current uncertainties we recommend a continued precautionary approach to the use of mobile phone technologies. This approach should be adopted by all involved in this area - including government, the mobile phone industry and all who choose to purchase a mobile phone for themselves, or their family, or their children."

There are more than 50m mobile phones in the UK compared with 4.5m a decade ago. ®

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