Feeds

The government open source dynamic

Trend analysis

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The news just broke that the Venezuelan government is planning to migrate to Open Source, having issued a decree to central government organizations to draft plans for migration.

The decree involves three phases of migration beginning with central government, then regional government and finally municipal government. Central ministries covered in the first phase are being asked to complete the migration within two years (unless they can demonstrate that the time frame cannot be met). The Venezuelan government has founded an Open Source academy in the city of Merida in an effort to provide a supply of capable staff.

This is yet another straw in the wind as regards global government commitments to and enthusiasm for Open Source. There is currently a remarkable amount of proposed legislation world wide that mandates the use of Open Source in government.

The countries where this is the case are: Argentina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, France, Italy and Peru. However, such legislation has previously been proposed and rejected in many countries simply because a blanket technology mandate is rarely practical.

More telling, in terms of a clear enthusiasm for Open Source are countries where a stated policy of a “preference” for Open Source has been declared. Countries where this is the case, in some areas of government IT use, include: Bahrain, Belgium, China and Hong Kong, Costa Rica, France, Germany, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Malaysia, Poland, Portugal, Philippines and South Africa.

Beyond this, almost all governments have R&D projects which are investigating the practicality of Open Source for government use which will, in all probability lead to local policy guidelines at some point which favour open source.

There are three significant motivations for government sponsorship of Open Source. First of all, government spend on technology is very high and thus the idea of an established viable Open Source alternative to proprietary software is appealing because it must lead to cost reductions, either because it provides a bargaining position (against proprietary vendors) or because it replaces more expensive proprietary software.

Secondly, for most governments, proprietary software is an import which does little to enrich the economy, while an Open Source initiative is likely to promote the development of a local software industry.

Finally, governments usually see Open Source as a means of promoting IT standards which have the potential to reduce technology costs in the medium to long term – not just in the government sector but in the local economy. This is particularly important in less developed countries where the cost of IT is simply too high for many local businesses.

These many government initiatives are likely to have a far ranging impact on software technology in general because they will eventually legitimize and promote Open Source in many areas, particularly on the PC. Government promotion of Open Source is now becoming an established world wide trend and it is unlikely to be reversed.

© IT-analysis.com

Related stories

Dutch govt ends exclusive MS upgrade talks
Microsoft opens e-gov collaboration portal
Open Source ready for prime time in UK.gov, says OGC
NHS OSS white paper is 'disappeared'
UK tech specialist school pioneers open source switch
Paris may favour gradual switch from MS to open source

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
Keep that consumer browser tat away from our software says Oracle
Big Red decides it will only support Firefox's Extended Support Releases
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
TIBCO ponders new 'financial options', including sale or merger
Your challenge: find ways to satisfy shareholders of mid-sized enterprise software outfit
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.