Feeds

Boffins decode Chromosome 16

Fulfil USA's Human Genome commitment

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Scientists at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) have finished analysing and sequencing Chromosome 16. This completes the US share of the Human Genome Project, JGI said yesterday.

The research, published in today's issue of the science journal Nature, analysed the 880 genes, together consisting of 78m bases, making up Chromosome 16. These genes are implicated in the development of breast and prostate cancer, adult polycystic kidney disease, and Crohn's disease.

The scientists found many points where segmented duplication had occurred - sections of the chromosome were duplicated at other points on the chromosome, and even on entirely different chromosomes. They compared these regions to sequences in the genomes of other vertebrates, including chickens, dogs, mice and chimpanzees, looking for changes to the sequence since the last common ancestor, ranging from 5m to 400m years ago.

Work on Chromosome 16 at the DoE began in 1988 as part of DNA repair-gene studies. It was discovered that some of the genes on the chromosome were implicated in the detoxification and transport of heavy metals.

JGI is the first of the five primary Human Genome Project sequencing sites to publish a scientific article detailing the sequences of the chromosomes under their jurisdiction.

The JGI is now focusing its resources on other projects: "The considerable resources that the DoE has assembled to tackle the human genome are now being dedicated to illuminating the genomes of organisms that may figure into biological solutions to such challenges as economical hydrogen production, carbon sequestration, and environmental clean-up," said US Senator Pete Domenici, a Congressional proponent of efforts to sequence the human genome. ®

Related stories

£147.5m boost for British particle accelerators
Human genome data in hacker peril shocker
Human Genome out on CD

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers
Windmills, solar, tidal - all a 'false hope', say Stanford PhDs
The next big thing in medical science: POO TRANSPLANTS
Your brother's gonna die, kid, unless we can give him your, well ...
SEX BEAST SEALS may be egging each other on to ATTACK PENGUINS
Boffin: 'I think the behaviour is increasing in frequency'
Post-pub nosh neckfiller: The MIGHTY Scotch egg
Off to the boozer? This delicacy might help mitigate the effects
I'M SO SORRY, sobs Rosetta Brit boffin in 'sexist' sexy shirt storm
'He is just being himself' says proud mum of larger-than-life physicist
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.