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Samsung samples 512Mb GDDR 3 part

High-end graphics cards to get bigger buffers

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Samsung will put a 512Mb GDDR 3 SDRAM chip into full-scale production early next year, the chip maker has said.

The chip, which will be pitched at high-end graphics cards and games consoles, Samsung noted, has just started rolling off the South Korean giant's production lines in sample quantities.

GDDR 3 operates at 1.8V, down from the original GDDR spec's 2.5V. It is also designed to support higher clock frequencies than its predecessor, up to 800MHz and above. It provides an aggregate bandwidth of 6.4GBps per device thanks to a 1.6Gbps per pin data rate.

The third-generation GDDR spec. was first announced by its developer, ATI, back in October 2002, with support from Micro, Elpida and Infineon. Micron was first to claim it had begun sampling GDDR 3 chips in June 2003.

Ironically, given the technology's creator, it was Nvidia that first shipped a board based on GDDR 3 - the GeForce FX 5700 Ultra, in March 2004. The card used memory chips made by Samsung.

Samsung cited research suggesting the graphics-oriented memory market will total $1.47bn next year, up 30 per cent on 2004's expected total. ®

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