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Motorola free to sue Telsim owners in UK

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Handset maker Motorola yesterday won the right to pursue the Uzan family for money it claims was obtained fraudulently. Members of the Uzan family used to control Turkish mobile operator Telsim. They are accused by Motorola and Nokia of making fraudulent use of vendor financing arrangements.

The decision by the High Court effectively "domesticates" judgment from US courts last year which concluded that the family had committed fraud and awarded Motorola and Nokia more than $2bn, according to the Financial Times.

The UK case gives the companies the chance to seize London assets of the family, including two properties, one in Belgravia and several million pounds held here.

The firms are likely to try and extend the decision, or domesticate it again, in other countries where the family is known to have assets. ®

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