Feeds

Blair's broadband scheme canned

The ADITs have 'ad it

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Government's broadband plans are in tatters today following the implosion of a key strategy designed to aggregate public sector demand for broadband.

In January, nine regional Government bodies (ADITS) and an umbrella organisation at the Department for Trade and Industry (DTI) began work pooling £1bn of public sector spending on broadband. Less than a year later the central body overseeing the scheme is closing and the regional bodies are also considering their future. A spokesman for the DTI said: "The central team at the DTI will be winding up at the end of the year. This was always anticipated. The scheme has been devolved to the regions - it is a matter for each of them what to do."

But the signs are not good for the Government, which has already wasted £15m on the doomed scheme. According to information received at The Register, the regional aggregation boards are falling like ninepins.

Three regional ADITs have closed, or are in the process of closing. No one from the South East England Development Agency (SEEDA), South West of England Regional Development Agency (SWEEDA) and the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA) - which back their regional ADITs - was available for comment at the time of writing.

A spokesman for Yorkshire Forward, the regional development agency (RDA) behind Adit Yorkshire & Humber, could only provide limited support for the scheme. "Yorkshire Forward continues to support it, for the time being," he said.

Critics claim this is yet another IT cock-up by the Government which has spent three years and millions of pounds on a project which always looked destined for the rubbish bin. ®

Related stories

Gov UK names broadband aggregation bidders
E-minister calls for business broadband targets for 2010
Campaigners quiz UK.gov on BB aggregation plans

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.