Feeds

Broadcom sues seven over 'stolen' chip secrets

Alleges start-up engaged in industrial espionage

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Wireless chip maker Broadcom has accused start-up MagiComm Technology Inc. of engaging in "a well-orchestrated, international scheme to steal from Broadcom trade secrets" - allegations MagiComm's legal representative described as "fallacious and inflammatory".

Broadcom has launched legal action against three current and four former employees it claims attempted to pilfer Broadcom technology to fuel MagiComm's product development efforts, the Associated Press reports.

The lawsuits, filed on 3 November in the US District Court for Santa Ana, claims one Leo Li, until 5 October this year a senior director within Broadcom's Mobile Communications Division, and three other ex-Broadcom staffers not only took mobile phone chip technology secrets with them when they quit in order to run MagiComm, but also attempted to use those secrets to take business away from their former employer.

As evidence, Broadcom claims to possess a number of emails sent from MagiComm to a Broadcom employee. The emails, it says, attempt to persuade the employee to send its chip designs to the start-up.

However, Li's lawyer, Brad Blocker, told AP that Broadcom had got it wrong. MagiComm is not in the business to competing with Broadcom, he said, but to design mobile phone handsets based on Broadcom's technology.

All seven individuals cited in Broadcom's lawsuit joined the company in 2002 when it acquired Mobilink Telecom for $258m. Mobilink was bought to kick-start Broadcom's own entry into the mobile phone chip market. ®

Related stories

Broadcom nicks Philips boss
Broadcom reveals 'VoIP over Wi-Fi' chipset
Broadcom simplifies Wi-Fi security set-up
Broadcom acquires Sand Video
Toshiba takes Hynix to task in patent clash
Graphics patent holder sues Sony, MS, Nintendo
LG, Matsushita trade lawsuits in PDP patent clash
Lexmark suffers setback in DMCA case
Nvidia accused of patent violation
Cornice countersues Western Digital

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
DOUBLE BONK: Testy fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets
Users wail as tapcash transactions are duplicated
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web
While America tucks into Thanksgiving turkey, the world will be taking over the net
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.