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ATI to spend $10m on Korean R&D plant

Exploring PDA 'transmission technologies', apparently

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ATI is to create an R&D centre on South Korea geared toward digital TV and mobile phone multimedia technologies.

The centre is expected to cost ATI $10m over the next five years, though it will also receive a number of grants from the South Korean government and regional administrations, according to a Joong Ang Daily report.

The deal was brokered by South Korea's Trade-Investment Promotion Agency. Its subsidiary, Invest Korea, has apparently been trying to tie down the Canadian company for two years.

In addition to the usual graphics technologies ATI will be investigating at the centre, the report also notes an interest in "certain transmission technologies involving personal digital assistants". Is ATI planning a move into the wireless arena, we wonder? ®

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