Feeds

Compuware extends DevPartner Studio

Pre-emptive error-handling tool

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Last week Compuware made two new and very significant announcements with respect to its DevPartner Studio product that push the boundaries of what one can expect from an IDE.

First, and for those of you that don't know, DevPartner Studio is a developer productivity tool designed to work in conjunction with various versions of Visual Studio and Visual Studio .NET (and there is also a Java version), in such a fashion that you can't tell which Studio product you are using. It has been designed specifically to detect errors and problems and to help the developer to correct these. Over and beyond this, the aim of the DevPartner Studio environment is to find these issues as early as possible within the development lifecycle, when they are easiest and cheapest to fix.

The new releases are Fault Simulator and Security Checker, both of which should be generally available around the end of this year or early next, and each of which does more or less what its name suggests. However, since I am not aware of anyone else that does fault simulation like Compuware does (if at all) and as the Security Checker also has features that are not generally available elsewhere, it is worth discussing these in a little more detail.

As far as Fault Simulator is concerned, this allows you to create a fault of your choice (memory, heap, disk I/O, .NET framework, or whatever) at any desired location and then test the environment to see whether the error is handled properly. If that turns out not to be the case, then you can step through the relevant code using your debugger in order to rectify the fault handling procedure.

The important point here is that error handling is typically a reactive issue: you wait for a fault to occur and then work out how to fix it. With Fault Simulator you can pre-emptively test for error handling and, because you can detect problems earlier in the development lifecycle, it costs less to fix them. Notable features include the support for both managed and unmanaged code, the ability to trap messages passed between the application and the operating system, and a facility to incorporate fault simulation into testing routines such as regression testing.

On the surface, Security Checker, which Compuware describes as a "vulnerability assessment scanner" might not appear so innovative. However, it supports three types of security check: integrity checking, compile-time checking (also known as static analysis) and run-time checking, each of which can be run against part or all of an application, as required. It is run-time checking that Compuware reckons to be unique, allowing you to determine potential dangers such as weak passwords, SQL text commands, write access allowed to a system directory, and so on, all of which could provide a potential hacker with an opportunity to attack the system.

The results of each check are presented graphically according to the severity of the danger (in a pie chart) and the type of problem (in a bar chart). You can then drill down to the individual problems that have been identified and, ultimately, to the relevant source code. Extensive help and repair suggestions are provided, which are displayed automatically as you drill further. At present, Security Checker is only available for ASP .NET environments, because that is where Compuware sees the largest threat, but no doubt it will expand to other environments in due course.

To conclude: one is often inclined to wonder if IDEs have gone as far as they can go in terms of additional functionality that can be plugged into them. These new DevPartner Studio releases suggest that we have not reached the end of that road yet.

Copyright © 2004, IT-Analysis.com

IBM software vendors feel the love
Judge - IBM must pay for Compuware software probe
Most firms cannot count cost of IT downtime

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
SLURP! Flick your TONGUE around our LOLLIPOP – Google
Android 5 is coming – IF you're lucky enough to have the right gadget
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.