Feeds

Compuware extends DevPartner Studio

Pre-emptive error-handling tool

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

Last week Compuware made two new and very significant announcements with respect to its DevPartner Studio product that push the boundaries of what one can expect from an IDE.

First, and for those of you that don't know, DevPartner Studio is a developer productivity tool designed to work in conjunction with various versions of Visual Studio and Visual Studio .NET (and there is also a Java version), in such a fashion that you can't tell which Studio product you are using. It has been designed specifically to detect errors and problems and to help the developer to correct these. Over and beyond this, the aim of the DevPartner Studio environment is to find these issues as early as possible within the development lifecycle, when they are easiest and cheapest to fix.

The new releases are Fault Simulator and Security Checker, both of which should be generally available around the end of this year or early next, and each of which does more or less what its name suggests. However, since I am not aware of anyone else that does fault simulation like Compuware does (if at all) and as the Security Checker also has features that are not generally available elsewhere, it is worth discussing these in a little more detail.

As far as Fault Simulator is concerned, this allows you to create a fault of your choice (memory, heap, disk I/O, .NET framework, or whatever) at any desired location and then test the environment to see whether the error is handled properly. If that turns out not to be the case, then you can step through the relevant code using your debugger in order to rectify the fault handling procedure.

The important point here is that error handling is typically a reactive issue: you wait for a fault to occur and then work out how to fix it. With Fault Simulator you can pre-emptively test for error handling and, because you can detect problems earlier in the development lifecycle, it costs less to fix them. Notable features include the support for both managed and unmanaged code, the ability to trap messages passed between the application and the operating system, and a facility to incorporate fault simulation into testing routines such as regression testing.

On the surface, Security Checker, which Compuware describes as a "vulnerability assessment scanner" might not appear so innovative. However, it supports three types of security check: integrity checking, compile-time checking (also known as static analysis) and run-time checking, each of which can be run against part or all of an application, as required. It is run-time checking that Compuware reckons to be unique, allowing you to determine potential dangers such as weak passwords, SQL text commands, write access allowed to a system directory, and so on, all of which could provide a potential hacker with an opportunity to attack the system.

The results of each check are presented graphically according to the severity of the danger (in a pie chart) and the type of problem (in a bar chart). You can then drill down to the individual problems that have been identified and, ultimately, to the relevant source code. Extensive help and repair suggestions are provided, which are displayed automatically as you drill further. At present, Security Checker is only available for ASP .NET environments, because that is where Compuware sees the largest threat, but no doubt it will expand to other environments in due course.

To conclude: one is often inclined to wonder if IDEs have gone as far as they can go in terms of additional functionality that can be plugged into them. These new DevPartner Studio releases suggest that we have not reached the end of that road yet.

Copyright © 2004, IT-Analysis.com

IBM software vendors feel the love
Judge - IBM must pay for Compuware software probe
Most firms cannot count cost of IT downtime

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think

More from The Register

next story
PEAK LANDFILL: Why tablet gloom is good news for Windows users
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Fiendishly complex password app extension ships for iOS 8
Just slip it in, won't hurt a bit, 1Password makers urge devs
Mozilla keeps its Beard, hopes anti-gay marriage troubles are now over
Plenty on new CEO's todo list – starting with Firefox's slipping grasp
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Cloudy CoreOS Linux distro declares itself production-ready
Lightweight, container-happy Linux gets first Stable release
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?