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Elpida offers 800MHz 1Gb DDR 2 chip

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Elpida has created what it claims is the world's first 800MHz DDR 2 SDRAM chip with a 1Gb capacity.

The Japanese memory maker - which this month IPO'd on the Tokyo stock exchange - admits that the market is "not ready for such advanced products in applications today", but nonetheless if anyone wants 800MHz DDR 2 parts, it's your man: "Elpida has the ability to offer DDR2-800 devices based on market demand," it claimed.

The chip itself is fabbed at 100nm and sports a circuit layout that "reduces bottlenecks on the signal and data paths in the memory array and peripherals" - the keys, apparently, to getting the clock frequency up to 800MHz in such a dense device.

Of course, 800MHz DDR 2 is not a formal standard yet. JEDEC, the memory industry's standards-setting body, is still in the process of approving 667MHz DDR 2. ®

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