Feeds

MS CRM wins hearts, minds, wallets

Business is key, not technology

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

David Batt, general manager of Microsoft CRM, said the CRM market is growing at between 10 and 15 per cent but Microsoft's CRM offering has grown more than 80 per cent a year in its first three years. Microsoft has found 3,500 customers and claims 62 per cent would be happy to be reference customers for the vendor.

According to Batt, the firm's success is down to its focus on the small and medium-sized business and its indirect sales force. Microsoft has 500 independent software vendors selling CRM.

"We looked at the CRM market and saw the likes of Salesforce, SAP, Siebel and PeopleSoft," he said. "But they are largely focused on the upper to mid-market. We are focused on smaller and medium-sized companies."

Many customers had never made a CRM decision because the technology scared them; others had tried and failed to install CRM systems. Batt said firms do CRM every day, they just don't call it by that name.

He claims three main drivers for Microsoft's CRM growth:

First, a quick business benefit: "We can get up and running quickly and show them the business benefits," he says.

Second, for mid-sized companies which are already Microsoft houses the ease of bolting on CRM to existing MS systems.

Third, firms which are choosing a CRM product and want one which runs on a Microsoft platform to make integration easier.

Batt believes the industry will continue to consolidate at the higher end and warns that customers concerns can get lost in such a noisy marketplace. Asked about competing firms he said: "We see Sage typically with customers who are rethinking a failed CRM project. Many of our customers are people who've never made a CRM decision - we can integrate with Outlook or Word, that's something Sage can't do. Sage and Microsoft do compete over customers - but it's not been an impediment to our growth."

According to Batt, salesforce.com tends to focus more on higher end customers rather than the small and medium firms targeted by Microsoft. Asked if open source was a threat, he said: "Business is key, not technology. These customers aren't interested in how good our technology, or anyone else's, is, they care about business." ®

Related stories

Sage rebadges CRM for smaller biz
From soup to nuts with Microsoft s collaboration chief
UK councils failing to meet e-services deadline

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.