Feeds

MPAA takes filesharers to court

Seeking injunctions, and fines of $150k

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The Motion Picture Association of America has gone on the offensive in its battle against piracy and peer-to-peer sharing of movies, and has launched more than 200 civil suits against users it identifies as being the worst offenders.

The organisation has filed between 200 and 300 lawsuits, according to reports, and the Los Angeles Times says it is particularly targeting people who pirate movies before their DVD release. Individual filesharers could be liable for $30,000 per illegally traded file, and up to $150,000 if the infringement is found to have been "willful".

"The motion-picture industry must pursue legal proceedings against people who are stealing our movies on the Internet," said Dan Glickman, MPAA's Chief Executive Officer. "The future of our industry, and of the hundreds of thousands of jobs it supports, must be protected from this kind of outright theft using all available means."

As well as the legal action, the MPAA is launching a publicity campaign, taking full page ads in college newspapers, and the Wall Street Journal, and with the help of the Video Software Dealers Association, posting the adverts in video rental outlets.

The organisation, which represents Hollywood's biggest studios, says it will also release free software that will identify music, movies and peer-to-peer software on any computer. This is designed for parents who feel the need to check up on their kids' online activities, and other computer owners whose machines might be used by third parties. The software will flag infringing music or movie files, the MPAA said, allowing users to remove them. ®

Related stories

Stealing movies: why the MPAA can afford to relax
Belgians moot computer licensing
Music biz in unauthorised downloads shock
Much smoke to BPI's fileshare suits, but where's the fire?

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.