Feeds

MPAA takes filesharers to court

Seeking injunctions, and fines of $150k

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The Motion Picture Association of America has gone on the offensive in its battle against piracy and peer-to-peer sharing of movies, and has launched more than 200 civil suits against users it identifies as being the worst offenders.

The organisation has filed between 200 and 300 lawsuits, according to reports, and the Los Angeles Times says it is particularly targeting people who pirate movies before their DVD release. Individual filesharers could be liable for $30,000 per illegally traded file, and up to $150,000 if the infringement is found to have been "willful".

"The motion-picture industry must pursue legal proceedings against people who are stealing our movies on the Internet," said Dan Glickman, MPAA's Chief Executive Officer. "The future of our industry, and of the hundreds of thousands of jobs it supports, must be protected from this kind of outright theft using all available means."

As well as the legal action, the MPAA is launching a publicity campaign, taking full page ads in college newspapers, and the Wall Street Journal, and with the help of the Video Software Dealers Association, posting the adverts in video rental outlets.

The organisation, which represents Hollywood's biggest studios, says it will also release free software that will identify music, movies and peer-to-peer software on any computer. This is designed for parents who feel the need to check up on their kids' online activities, and other computer owners whose machines might be used by third parties. The software will flag infringing music or movie files, the MPAA said, allowing users to remove them. ®

Related stories

Stealing movies: why the MPAA can afford to relax
Belgians moot computer licensing
Music biz in unauthorised downloads shock
Much smoke to BPI's fileshare suits, but where's the fire?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
Bladerunner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it
Go ahead, you're all clear, kid... Sorry, wrong film
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
Forget Hillary, HP's ex CARLY FIORINA 'wants to be next US Prez'
Former CEO has political ambitions again, according to Washington DC sources
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.