Feeds

Security incidents and cybercrime on the up

Spam showers with squalls of exploits predicted

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Security events recorded between July and September this year are up 150 per cent on those recorded by security company VeriSign in the same period last year.

VeriSign's Internet Security Intelligence Briefing, published today, concludes that increased financial rewards and the greater sophistication of the computer underworld and making the internet a more dangerous environment. In particular the firm warns on the growth of hybrid attacks - such as computer worms that use a variety of techniques in attempts to compromise user systems or attacks that use system exploits in order to steal sensitive information through secondary assaults.

On the other hand, VeriSign also reports that security incidents in Q3 2004 are down on those recorded in the first two quarters of this year - so it's not all bad.

VeriSign's figures come via its security monitoring services business. This division handles more than 250 million daily security events from firewall, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS), Virtual Private Networks (VPN) and endpoint systems on behalf of VeriSign's various clients.

Spam tsunami, phishing flood

VeriSign's Payment Services currently process more than 35 per cent of North American ecommerce transaction. From this data, VeriSign estimates ecommerce spending in Q3 2004 is up 25 per cent from Q3 2003. The volume of SSL certs in use increased 19 per cent over the same period.

According to VeriSign, fraud losses grew faster than could be explained by the growth in ecommerce alone. The US topped the ranking for countries with the highest volume of fraudulent transactions in Q3 2004, followed by Vietnam and Indonesia. The UK came fourth in this roll-call of shame. VeriSign doesn't quote raw figures on financial losses in making this comparison.

Spam is a major enabler for the rise in cybercrime, according to VeriSign. "Spam continues to be the primary vector for internet crimes, including advance fee fraud, phishing ploys and work-at-home carding schemes. Networks of captured machines or "botnets" are now routinely used to deliver spam, which can help seed virus distributions and Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks," it notes. "During the past 12 months, Internet crime has become more organized and directed toward achieving financial reward. Spam solicitations have become increasingly aggressive to combat more effective filtering solutions that limit the number of victims they can reach." ®

Related stories

Rise of the Botnets
Phatbot arrest throws open trade in zombie PCs
RSA cosies up to AOL as VeriSign enters token market
Big.biz struggles against security threats

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods
Not just web servers under threat - though TENS of THOUSANDS have been hit
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.