Feeds

Sun's Linux wins right to be considered in Japan

They're on a list, and they want to tell us all about it

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

Sun Microsystems has opened a second front for its Linux-based desktop operating system in Asia with a Japanese win of sorts. Sun's Java Desktop System has been picked as one open source OS of preference during a competition held by the Information-technology Promotion Agency in Japan (IPA). This clears the way for Sun's software to be picked as an open source alternative to Microsoft's Windows at Japanese schools. Sun last year enjoyed a much bigger and more concrete win in China when the government selected the Java Desktop System for at least 500,000 desktops.

"METI is promoting the deployment of open source software to provide more choice of desktop environments for users," said Takashi Kume, a deputy director at the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in Japan. "METI has delegated project implementation to IPA and the Sun Java Desktop System was selected as a platform for the open source software verification program for the educational community. METI believes that when open source software is used more pervasively, starting with initiatives like this one, the open source community becomes more active and will promote increased choice of information technology in Japan."

This announcement would be a lot more impressive if Sun could say that some actual Java Desktop Shipments were making their way to Japan. It's a bit unusual for a vendor the size of Sun to issue a statement about winning the rights to be considered for something. Perhaps there is a nuance to this deal that eludes us, but we doubt it. If the Japanese government had placed orders for shipments, you would most certainly have heard about it.

That said, Sun is making noticeable open source headway in Japan. Most notably, Sun's StarOffice productivity suite earned mythological status earlier this year in a Japanese convenience store. The software inspired a woman to give birth to a horse right between store racks full of magazines and candy bars.

Back to your blogs, Sun staff. And tell us some news, next time. ®

Related stories

One standard, one Microsoft - how the NHS sold its choice
Vodafone inks global deal with Sun
Security Report: Windows vs Linux
Sun: MS truce clears way to open source Solaris
McNealy: Microsoft needs Sun to beat IBM and Red Hat

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.