Feeds

Sun deputizes Versora for Microsoft attack

Arrest IIS, little buddy

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Sun Microsystems has signed up a new recruit to help it move customers off of Microsoft server software and onto either Sun's own products or open source code.

Versora, a small company based in Santa Barbara, California, is the newest member of Sun's iForce partner program. The firm makes products that automatically move code from Windows IIS servers to Apache servers. Sun will be looking to shift customers onto both Apache and its own Java System Web Server.

"There's a really good sized market of people that want to get off IIS and need some hand holding," said Mike Sheffey, CEO of Versora.

The main motivations to move off of IIS are two fold, according to Sheffey and much of the world at large. Security concerns clearly rank pretty high for ISS users that are continually pounded by nefarious characters. In addition, companies are looking to mix up their products to give them better leverage against Microsoft.

"I am very paranoid about getting trapped into any monopolistic relationship," said Rob Hale, CIO at Select Personnel and one of Versora's early customers. "I have kept my eye on third parties that support and assist with open source activities."

Select Personnel has picked up Versora's Progression Web product to move from Windows NT/IIS servers to Linux/Apache servers.

"We didn't have to modify any Windows ASP code," Hale said. "We are still using it on Linux/Apache running on top of Sun's Java System ASP."

Versora is basically just getting off the ground, but it has bold ambitions. The company has already teamed with Novell on some Windows to Linux migration efforts, particularly shifting from IIS to the SuSE Linux Apache Web Server. Versora's products work with all the major flavors of Windows Server, SuSE OSes, Red Hat OSes and Mac OS X.

The company is also building out its database migration arsenal, hoping to push customers from Microsoft's SQL Server to MySQL and Postgres.

Sun will likely welcome Versora with open arms in as many accounts as possible. One of Sun's key missions with Linux is to pull customers off of Microsoft software products in order to open up larger hardware/software sales for Sun. ®

Related stories

Security Report: Windows vs Linux
Open sourcerers slam licensing slur
BOFH: The enemy at the gate
Does open source software enhance security?

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.