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Wales to host new £1m CRT recycling plant

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A new recycling plant in Wales is set to create 70 jobs by turning old computer waste into something useful.

The £1m investment will enable the new Citiraya Recycling Technology plant to recycle old Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) TV screens and computer monitors. The 35,000 square feet plant is due to open in December and will be able to recycle 500,000 CRT screens a year.

Said Singapore-based Citiraya in a statement: "[The plant] will deploy one of the first Laser Cutting Technology processes in the UK. These processes provide safe removal of the phosphor layer, separation and segregation of the panel and funnel glass cullet, thus enabling the separated fractions to be recycled and reused in manufacturing new CRT."

The opening of the plant is due to come ahead of new European legislation - Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive - designed to regulate how businesses reuse, reclaim, recycle and dispose of surplus electronic equipment. ®

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