Feeds

Airespace extends WLAN switch line to SMEs

All the security, management features, for fewer APs

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

WLAN switch maker Airespace today extended its enterprise-oriented product line downmarket with a new wireless network controller pitched at small to medium-sized businesses.

The Airespace 3500 provides the same access point, security and radio coverage capabilities as the company's more corporate-oriented boxes, but controls fewer access points. That, said Jeff Aaron, a senior Airespace product marketing manager, makes it suitable not only for big enterprises' branch offices but smaller businesses too.

Traditional consumer/SME kit may be well-suited to smaller premises, but it doesn't provide the enterprise-level functionality such customers are increasingly demanding, he told The Register. 'Smaller' in Jeff's book is 10,000-60,000sq ft.

The 3500 connects up to six 'thin' 802.11a/b/g access points running the Lightweight Access Point Protocol (LWAPP). Based on the company's own AireOS, the switch provides real time RF management to maximise the coverage the access points provide, eliminating, the company claims, the need for site surveys. The 3500 also provides location tracking, suiting it to RFID-style applications.

On the security side, the 3500 watches out for attempts to gain unauthorised access to the WLAN - partly by detecting out-of-the-building clients and partly through full 802.11i/WPA 2 support.

The unit also provides Wi-Fi Multimedia (WMM) pre-802.11e quality of service support to prioritise packets, allowing time-dependent data such as audio or video to be sent ahead of data that can safely wait a few microseconds. Aaron also said the 3500 provides a level of bandwidth segmentation to further improve the delivery of, say, VoIP traffic. However, he pledged the company's technology would remain in step with 802.11e, which has not yet been ratified by the IEEE.

The 3500 connects and extends an existing LAN infrastructure through four 10/100Mbps Ethernet ports. The switch it due to ship next month. Pricing starts at $2000. ®

Related stories

Wi-Fi Alliance unveils media streaming quality tech
Aruba touts Wi-Fi grid scheme
Cisco offers WLAN switching

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
DEATH by COMMENTS: WordPress XSS vuln is BIGGEST for YEARS
Trio of XSS turns attackers into admins
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?