Feeds

BT ponders music downloads for payphones

Boon for iPod muggers?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

UK telco BT could soon be selling digital music through its 70,000 payphones if talks with a major online music provider prove fruitful.

According to a BBC report, the telco wants to allow owners of portable music players to hook up their devices to modified payphones, then pay for and download songs.

The scheme is being considered as a way of getting the payphone network to start making money again. While maintenance costs haven't fallen, usage has, thanks to mobile phones. Only 60 per cent of BT's public call boxes and booths make money.

Given the rise in iPod-related crime, with muggers increasingly targeting owners of white earphones, we're not entirely sure owners of expensive gadgets will be happy standing around showing their prized possession to all and sundry as they wait for the latest number one single to download.

One benefit, however, could be the opportunity to recharge empty iPod batteries, a facility not mentioned by BT and which we offer to the telco at our usual commission rate. Again, we wonder how many users will be willing to make it quite so obvious that they're carrying anything to tempt the more light-fingered (or large-fisted) members of society.

BT already operates 1200-odd Internet access kiosks, mostly in city centres, and it's these that the company is initially considering modifying to add music player connectors.

The BT scheme follows similar moves by other payphone operators to find new revenue streams. In the UK, NWP Spectrum last year partnered with Wi-Fi operator The Cloud to install hotspots in payphones. Australian telco Telstra is taking that idea a stage further to equip payphones with kit needed to support financial district-wide Wi-Fi zones. &reg

Related stories

iPod: this season's must-have for muggers
Aussie telco moots payphone Wi-Fi hotzones
Payphone deal to take Cloud's hotspot tally to 10,000
Kiosks charge phones on the go
BT payphones to become phone aerials
The pay-phone is not dead!

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins
We don't need no steenkin' TCP/IP retransmission and the congestion it causes
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.