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O2 sues 3UK over ad bubbles

Trademark spat

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Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Two of the UK's biggest mobile phone operators are to meet in the High Court next month after O2 issued a writ against Hutchison Whampoa's 3 UK.

The action centres on O2's claim that 3 used "bubbles" in its ads. Snag is, O2 already uses bubble images in its ads and reckons that 3's use of bubbles infringes 17 of its trademarks. The court action will also challenge some of the claims made by 3 UK about its tariffs, Reuters reports.

A spokesman for O2 confirmed that the case is due to be heard in the High Court on November 5. No one from 3 UK was available for comment at the time of writing.

Last week, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) upheld eight out of nine complaints by O2 and rival T-Mobile (UK) against 3 UK, concerning a number of its ads and leaflets. The complaints focused on 3 UK marketing literature and the use of comparable tariffs and pricing structures. ®

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