Feeds

Identify file-sharers, judge tells UK ISPs

Given 14 days to comply ... or appeal

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

The English High Court today gave UK ISPs just 14 days to disclose the names and addresses of individuals the music industry claims have offered "massive" numbers of songs on P2P networks without permission.

The order, made by Mr. Justice Blackburne, follows a request from UK music trade association the British Phonographic Industry (BPI). Earlier this week, it warned it would begin legal proceedings against anyone offering music without authorisation, beginning with a list of 28 people it claims are among the worst offenders.

The identities of the 28 remain unknown, but today's ruling, unless challenged by the ISPs, will allow the BPI to target the alleged music uploaders by name. The organisation said it would offer them the opportunity to settle out of court. But it will seek injunctions against the individuals, along with monetary damages, if they resist.

In the US, similar tactics employed by the Recording Industry Ass. of America (RIAA) have led to many file traders agreeing to stop sharing and to paying an often nominal fine for their actions to date.

However, the RIAA's attempts to force ISPs to disclose names and addresses have run into problems. In January 2004, backing US ISP Verizon, the US District Court of Columbia ruled the RIAA could not force ISPs to hand over such information unless they themselves were subpoenaed. And since ISPs don't store the unauthorised tracks - the users do - that would be difficult.

This week, the US Supreme Court upheld an appeal court ruling that verified the original District Court verdict. ®

Related stories

UK record industry sues 28 file-sharers
MPAA asks Supreme Court to crush P2Pers
UK music biz set to sue file-sharers
Supremes sidestep RIAA's John Doe challenge
US judges blast music labels' attack on ISPs and users

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS
YouGov poll reveals terrible truth about the enemy within
Microsoft exits climate denier lobby group
ALEC will have to do without Redmond, it seems
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?