Feeds

Web to get dose of plain English

Simple as that

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The Plain English Campaign is stepping up its war against linguistic obfuscation with a new campaign in association with ebiz outfit TechnoPhobia. The plan is to promote user-friendly websites which conform to the amended Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) of 1995.

As of 1 October, the DDA requires, for instance, that job adverts on websites must - by law - be "available to people of mixed ability, whether they are able-bodied, have hearing or sight difficulties, or are suffering from any physical disability". Accordingly, the Plain English Campaign and TechnoPhobia have joined forces to "promote easily understood content for the web".

The two allies reckon that too little is being done by "New Media" to get straight to the point. The Plain English Campaign's George Maher said: "When you are involved in writing for a website, you can become too fixed on the job in hand and it is easy to confuse users by slipping into industry jargon."

The solution is simple: clean up your act and see if you can get a Plain English Campaign Internet Crystal Mark - the e-version of its respected print sign of approval. Why bother? Well, as TechnoPhobia's Pip Thorne puts it: "The business case for Plain English Campaign accreditation is obvious; if your website is usable and the content is easy to understand then it naturally follows that visitors will be more likely to convert into shoppers. The combined spending of the UK's disabled population is estimated to be in excess of £45 billion a year and an accessible site will allow purchasing on-line from a wider section of users."

And there you have it. Less is in this case most certainly more. ®

Bootnote

We at El Reg have been known to indulge in a bit of the old IT-related banter with a smidge of jargon and a soupçon of obtuse lexicological flourish, so we decided to make amends by supporting this year's Plain English Day - due to be celebrated on 6 December. We are not at this point able to reveal just how this audacious initiative will work, but readers can rest assured that they will most certainly be pleasantly surprised.

Related stories

IT vendors talk rubbish: official
IT firms use jargon to deceive
More Net-speak enters Oxford English Dictionary
BT's gibberish payment guide could cost you £193

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.