Feeds

RIAA hunts down more file-trading scum

Gets them where they study

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

SANS - Survey on application security programs

The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) knows how to kick off the back-to-school season with a splash, sending out another load of lawsuits to collegians everywhere.

The music-labels' front man sued 762 more file-trading evil-doers, pushing its grand lawsuit total well over 5,000. The focus of the latest batch of lawsuits is once again college students - with the RIAA highlighting 26 schools harboring copyright terrorists. "We'll crack down every dorm room door and hunt the criminals where they live, where they drink beer and where they study," said RIAA President Cary Sherman.

Okay, that's not the exact tack Sherman took in an RIAA statement about the lawsuit binge.

"There have been many exciting developments on the university front in recent months,'' Sherman actually said. ''An ever-expanding number of school administrators, often at the behest of students, are signing partnerships with legitimate online music services. Students get the benefit of high-quality, legal music while schools get to spend less time worrying about their students getting into trouble. It is a win-win for everyone.''

Er, it's not really a "win-win" for everyone. Cornell, for example, which is running a trial of the Napster music service has a mini-revolt on its hands. Students are complaining that the popular iPod does not work with Napster, that Mac users can't access Napster and that the school will force students to add to already exorbitant tuition fees by requiring that they pay for Napster.

Elsewhere, the Tennessee Board of Regents advised schools to steer clear of the costly Napster/RIAA tax. Other editorials in a variety of school papers are calling for their institutions to thoroughly consider the lack of standards in the "legal" music downloading market and the costs of such services before proceeding.

The RIAA is clearly using lawsuits as a method of goading universities toward subscription services that ensure a steady revenue stream for the slow-to-move labels. It's somewhat shocking to think that the US court system will permit a mere $13bn industry to bully the entire higher-education system into entering the music business.

Shouldn't the labels have been more proactive in the online music market instead of now using lawsuits to make up for past failings? Is it really students who should pay the price in this war between the RIAA and consumers at large? We digress.

If you haven't read this proposal on how the music business can save itself before it's really too late, the time to do so is now. ®

Related stories

UK music biz set to sue file-sharers
RIAA hunts for Leader of the Pack
Induce Act tweaks fail to stem concern
Music boss can't wait to sue British file sharers
New P2P software could end illegal music squabbles
Apple lovers start attack against Cornell's Napster trial

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Number crunching suggests Yahoo! US is worth less than nothing
China and Japan holdings worth more than entire company
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.