Feeds

Siemens picks Intel for 3D medical imaging

Do you have Intel on your insides?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

Siemens Medical Solutions is to build the next generation of its medical 3D imaging system on Intel's Xeon processor platform.

The workstations will deal with the heavy number crunching that Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) systems need to reconstruct three dimensional images from X-ray or MRI scan data.

Volker Kaiser, general manager of Siemens Medical Solutions, says the technology will make a real difference in patient assessment.

"The system has a virtual endoscopy function that will improve cancer detection, especially colon cancer," he told The Register. The new workstations have much higher resolutions and will improve a doctor's ability to make a diagnosis, with exploratory surgery, he said. Also, They have faster data processing and better rendering, so doctors can make speedier and more accurate diagnoses.

Image of chest cavity produced by Siemens medical 3D systemTom Garrison, a spokesman for enterprise marketing at Intel, argues that healthcare is "a great example of a sector where IT innovation enables real benefits in terms of patient care and tools for preventive medicine", adding: "The introduction of 3D imaging can transform patient care and understanding of conditions".

Currently, Kaiser says, most images from CT or MR scans are produced in two dimensions: "There are some 3D systems, but they are in the minority. With this platform we think that 3D diagnostics could become standard."

Siemens will present the technology to the medical community at the Radiology Congress in Chicago this November, and expects to deliver the first units in March next year. Depending on the set up and contract size, the workstations will cost between €5,000 and €10,000 each. ®

Related stories

Biometric gear to be deployed in hospitals and GPs' surgeries
Auditors take stock of NHS IT spend
Chip biz to fund independent cancer study

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Bad back? Show some spine and stop popping paracetamol
Study finds common pain-killer doesn't reduce pain or shorten recovery
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
World Solar Challenge contender claims new speed record
One charge sees Sunswift travel 500kms at over 100 km/h
SMELL YOU LATER, LOSERS – Dumbo tells rats, dogs... humans
Junk in the trunk? That's what people have
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.