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Bulldog has quietly airbrushed its precious industry accolade - ISPA's "Best consumer broadband ISP 2004" - until it resolves a backlog of issues that have made life a misery for its customers.

The gong is no longer visible on the ISP's website. And its recorded phone messages - which used to brag about the award - have also be edited to remove all mention of Bulldog being "Best consumer broadband ISP 2004".

Bulldog's decision to remove the logo followed a meeting with industry group ISPA last week. A spokesman for ISPA told us that "we advised Bulldog to remove it from their phone systems", although it seems the ISP went a step further and cut it from its website as well.

Curiously, one of Bulldog's sales team said the logo had been removed because the ISP is "designing a new website so it's been taken off". Either way, the vanishing logo is thought to be temporary. ISPA has already said it will not strip Bulldog of the award, even though more than 400 people have signed a petition calling on ISPA to take action.

Elsewhere, Bulldog customers have become so frustrated with the ISP and the lack of response from the company that they've called the top brass of parent company Cable & Wireless in a bid to get their problems resolved.


One punter who contacted the office of C&W chairman Richard Lapthorne said: "They have said they will look into it and someone will get back to me soon. But that was three hours ago and just like Bulldog, still no word when my broadband connection will be up and running again. It's a bit much to have to ring the chairman to get some answers - but I've tried everything else and this is my last resort." ®

Related stories

Bulldog blames 'admin error' for poor service
ISPA rejects calls to strip Bulldog of award
Hundreds of Bulldog users without broadband - again
Botched migration hits Bulldog users

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