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ABIT intros video card overclock tool

Plus ATI X300, X600-based boards

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ABIT today launched its first ATI-based graphics cards to incorporate overclocking software derived from the code its ships with its overclockable motherboards.

The RX600 Pro-Guru, X600 Pro-HDTV and RX300 SE-Guru boards both ship with vGuru, the video version of ABIT's µGuru overclocking utility. vGuru allows users to modify memory and core clock speeds and voltages, and adjust fan speeds. It also provides diagnostic tools to help fine-tune performance.

Overclocking each card can yield a performance boost of up to 25 per cent, ABIT claimed.

The code taps into each boards twin BIOS chips, one operational, the other for back-up in case the BIOS code becomes corrupted. Selecting one BIOS or the other is just a matter of rearranging a hardware jumper.

The 130nm X600 core provides four pixel pipelines, two vertex pipes and 128-bit memory bus. The X300, however, is ATI's first 110nm GPU. It offers the same four pixel pipelines and two vertex pipes as the X600.

Both Pro boards ship with 256MB of DDR SDRAM - the SE contains 128MB of memory. All three required a spare PCI Express connector. The boards are available now, but ABIT did not disclose pricing information. ®

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