Feeds

The CD is king

But you knew that already

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Sales of downloaded digital music in Europe will continue to grow steadily in the next five years, but will not replace the CD anytime soon.

That's according to a report by Jupiter Research called "European Digital Music: Identifying Opportunity," which predicts that digital music revenue will reach €836m, or eight per cent of the total market, by 2009.

"Our figures show strong adoption of digital music but it will remain a minority pursuit. We're forecasting single digit percentages of penetration over the next five years comparable to the impact of mini-disc players, which haven't revolutionised the way people consume music yet. That said, digital music devices will have a stronger role as time goes on but its not about to replace the CD," said Mark Mulligan, lead author of the Jupiter report.

This extensive report based on consumer surveys, interviews with online music executives and Jupiter's ranking of every legitimate online music service in Western Europe in areas such as catalogue availability and pricing.

Western European digital music revenues have grown considerably in the last 12 months, from €10.6m in 2003 to €46.3m. Growth was driven primarily by new market entrants such as iTunes and Napster who both launched services in June 2004. More recently Stelios Haji-Iannou, of easyJet fame, announced the launch of easyMusic, his online music store.

The popularity of online music has prompted a number of heavyweights to establish an online music presence. At the beginning of September Microsoft launched the MSN music store and Yahoo! bought digital music company Musicmatch. Yesterday, Virgin announced its launch into the online music market in the US with a view to expanding to other regions in the future.

As for who will succeed in this competitive industry; the Jupiter report expects companies who are not singularly focused on online music, but have other pre-existing revenue streams like selling devices or providing broadband access, to thrive.

© ENN

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.