Feeds

Tesco extends RFID chip roll-out

Pallet-able

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Tesco is dipping its toes in spy-chip waters again, despite suffering a storm of bad publicity when it tried attaching RFID chips to Gillette razors in July 2003. Britain's biggest supermarket chain ran a trial in Cambridge which took a picture of anyone who took a pack of razor blades from the shelves Gillette Mach3 razor blades are among the western world's most shop-lifted items. A pallet-load of blades costs as much as a new Ferrari. Consumer and privacy groups were less impressed with the trial, which was abandoned amid calls for a boycott of the store.

Today's announcement is that Tesco will attach RFID chips to pallets and cases rather than to individual items. The chips will be attached to pallets containing higher value electrical items like hairdryers.

The chips will contain supply-chain information and should give Tesco a clearer view of its inventory. Pallets and cases are "read" automatically as they leave the warehouse and again as they go into stores. The advantage over bar codes is that reading an RFID chip does not require clear line of sight. There are still difficulties with the accuracy of the readings but RFID readers fitted to a warehouse or store door should be able to keep track of all pallets carried through it.

This will now be rolled out to 12 distribution centres serving 100 stores. Complete rollout is expected by summer 2005.

A spokesman said suppliers would not be affected at this time because the chips will be attached once the products are delivered to Tesco's distribution centre. US retailer WalMart has been criticised for forcing its suppliers to adopt RFID chips. ®

Related stories

Technology credited with cutting retail theft
Outbreak of RFID tagging at medical facilities
Wal-Mart attracts more RFID flak

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.