Feeds

Adobe proposes universal digicam 'raw' image format

'Digital negative'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Adobe is to promote a 'standard' alternative to digital cameras' numerous 'raw' photo formats.

Dubbed Digital NeGative (DNG) format, Adobe's proposal would not supersede the JPEG format used by almost all digicams these days, but the native formats such cameras offer users who want maximum, image fidelity.

These raw formats hold the image as taken, without the loss of data even mildest JPEG conversion involves, or adjustments made by the camera's video processing electronics. The catch is that without compression, raw images are very large, limiting the number of them the camera can hold. Worse, different camera vendors use different, proprietary raw formats.

Adobe as gone some way to licensing such formats where it can, but it's clearly decided that a single, vendor-neutral raw format makes more sense, hence the DNG proposal.

It's pitch is that such a format would allows photographers who require lossless images to work in Photoshop without having to grab and save the images using software from their camera's manufacturer.

DNG is based on the TIFF-EP format with extra metadata and scope for lossless JPEG compression, Adobe said. The format supports both mosaiced (CFA) and demosaiced interpolation.

Adobe has launched a plug-in for Photoshop which converts over 14 camera makers' raw formats into DNG. The plug-in, for Windows and Mac versions of Photoshop, is accompanied by software that adds support for those raw formats to the CS version of Adobe's imaging application directly. The downloads are free but require registration.

Adobe has also published the DNG spec. to allow camera makers to incorporate it into future products. ®

Related stories

Adobe beats the Street
Adobe beta tests Acrobat Reader 7.0
PDF tagging for the blind
Adobe's Warnock awarded Lovelace Medal
JPEG patent holder renews royalty offensive
Intel touts 'MP3 for 3D' universal graphics format

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.