Feeds

Microsoft settles Sendo 'tech theft' lawsuit

Both sides 'happy'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

UK mobile phone maker and erstwhile Microsoft partner Sendo today said they had settled their long-running legal dispute.

The terms and conditions of the out-of-court deal were not disclosed, but it is known that Microsoft will hand back its four per cent stake in the privately held Sendo.

Sendo was Microsoft's original smart phone partner, but the two fell out in 2002 when the manufacturer accused the software giant of nicking its technology and customers.

Due to ship in November 2002, Sendo's Z100 handset, based on Microsoft Windows for Smartphones 2002 OS, was canned weeks before its launch. The move was accompanied by Sendo's revelation that it had opted to go with the Symbian OS instead.

Sendo's Sendo X Series 60 handset finally shipped earlier this summer.

Back in late November 2002, Sendo said it had dropped Microsoft after conducting a smart phone strategy review, but, tellingly, less than two months later it initiated legal proceedings against its former OS partner.

"If we had a choice we would have launched the Z100 - we have customers, we were days away from shipping - but we had no other course of action," said Marijke van Hooren, Sendo's director of communications, at the time.

Sendo accused Microsoft of maintaining a "secret plan... to plunder the small company of its proprietary information, technical expertise, market knowledge, customers and prospective customers... Microsoft gained Sendo's trust and confidence through false promises that Sendo would be its 'go-to-market-partner'."

"Microsoft used Sendo's knowledge and expertise to its benefit to gain direct entry into the burgeoning next-generation mobile phone market and then, after driving Sendo to the brink of bankruptcy, cut it out of the picture," the company's original US court filing alleged.

"Microsoft provided Sendo's proprietary hardware expertise and trade secrets to low-cost original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) who would not otherwise have had the expertise to manufacture handsets that would use (Microsoft software) and used Sendo's carrier-customer relationships to establish its own contractual relationships," the lawsuit said.

Sendo later sued mobile phone network Orange, claiming the network's Microsoft-based SPV handset violated its intellectual property, but the two companies soon settled out of court.

Sendo today said it was "extremely pleased" with the terms of the settlement of a legal action that is believed to have cost it a tidy sum. Microsoft gets off with a denial of any and all liability.

Microsoft, too, said it was "pleased with this resolution", Reuters reports. ®

Related stories

Sendo wins round one of MS smartphone secrets lawsuit
Post TI deal, Sendo and Orange settle MS phone suit
Sendo sues Orange over MS SPV smartphone IP
Microsoft's Tanager phone breaches patent too - Sendo
Sendo sues Microsoft over 'secret plan'
Sendo junks MS smartphone, joins Nokia camp
MS Stinger, my part in its downfall, by Sendo?
Sendo to launch Z100 MS 'Stinger' in November
Microsoft banks on Sendo for smartphones
Symbian scores Siemens, MS ripostes with Stinger for H2

Related reviews

Sendo X: phone meets PDA, MP3 player, light sabre

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.