Feeds

Gizza job, virus writers ask AV industry

Hidden message in latest MyDoom worm

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

The unknown authors of the latest variant of the MyDoom email worm have embedded a hidden message inside their code, asking for a job in the anti-virus industry.

Like previous variants, the MyDoom-U and MyDoom-V worms spread via email with a malicious file attachment. Opening the attachment results in the activation of the worm and an attempt to download a backdoor Trojan horse called Surila onto infected machines.

Hidden inside these worms' code is a message that states "We searching 4 work in AV industry". No contact details and any other information is appended to the curious message. Neither of the new variants is spreading in large numbers since their appearance on the Net yesterday (September 9).

Romanian AV firm BitDefender offers a couple of theories on the message. “It seems the VX [virus writing] business simply isn't that profitable anymore due to the efforts of AV researchers, or else the person or persons behind Bagle really are winning the much-hyped ‘war of words and worms’,” it said.

"It's hard to tell if the creators of these new versions of the MyDoom worm are being serious, but there is no way that anybody in the anti-virus industry would touch them with a bargepole," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos. "It's very simple - if you write a virus, we will never ever employ you. Not only is it deeply unethical to write malicious code, but it raises issues as to whether you could ever be trusted to develop the software which protects millions of users around the world from attack every day."

Aside from ethical considerations, Sophos reckons the skills needed to write computer viruses are far removed from those needed to write reliable AV software.

The practice of virus writers posting appeals for work in malicious code is rare but not unprecedented. Michael Buen, a suspect in the Love Bug case, included his CV in a Word macro virus he produced, called Michael-B. Neither the virus - nor Buen's CV - spread particularly far. ®

Related stories

Telenor takes down 'massive' botnet
Infected PCs spew MyDoom variant
We're all MyDoomed
MS posts $250,000 MyDoom worm bounty
War of the worms turns into war of words

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Attackers raid SWISS BANKS with DNS and malware bombs
'Retefe' trojan uses clever spin on old attacks to grant total control of bank accounts
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.