Feeds

SEC to examine Playboy for boobs

Larry, Sergey grace the glossy

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Remote control for virtualized desktops

The Securities and Exchange Commission will be examining the September issue of Playboy even more closely than normal. The reason? The appearance of a pair of boobs at a particularly sensitive time.

The boobs in question are Google Inc. founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, who have punctuated the company's mandatory pre-IPO period with an extensive interview with the monthly. The interview itself was conducted on 22 April, at the end of a Spring publicity campaign. Google filed its initial public offering a week later.

"This interview is going to cause regulatory concern," a former SEC attorney tells USA Today. "There could be consequences." Columnist John C Dvorak adds, "You cannot live in and around Silicon Valley and not know you cannot do this stuff. I think many of these stunts are perhaps on purpose," he says, a theme echoed on bulletin boards. [Er - nice beaver, John].

The concerns maybe premature. SEC is only likely to get involved if the statements differ from public filings. As the Washington Post noted in May, Google hadn't exactly been reticent after filing its Coca Cola Jingle. But there's nothing new here you haven't heard many times before.

Simply the obligatory references to Rollerblades and Segways, random toys, not being evil, helping school children in Cambodia (by giving them Gmail accounts) and connecting Google "to your mind". We learn that Larry Page "wore shoes" throughout the interview and that at one point he vowed, oddly, "we will not hold your email hostage." He suggests that Google-gamers who "optimize" their results for the search engine may eventually find "realize that it's more efficient just to pay to promote their things, if that's what they want to do."

We know this, because leaving nothing to chance, Google has reprinted the entire Playboy interview on its IPO website, with the following warning

Risk Factors—If our involvement in a September 2004 magazine article about Google were held to be in violation of the Securities Act of 1933, we could be required to repurchase securities sold in this offering. You should rely only on statements made in this prospectus in determining whether to purchase our shares for certain information in the following article that has been modified or updated.

Due diligence? They've heard of it.®

Related Stories

Google! Licenses! Yahoo's! Secret! Sauce!
Google IPO 'hangs in the balance'
Google goes gimpy from MyDoom infection
Google must buy back buddy stock
Google demotes Coca Cola jingle
Google decides banner ads, skyscrapers are not evil
Google files Coca Cola jingle with SEC

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Holy vintage vehicles! Earliest known official Batmobile goes on sale
Riddle me this: are you prepared to pay US$180k?
Bible THUMP: Good Book beats Darwin to most influential tome title
Folio Society crowns fittest of surviving volumes
'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?
Plus: Flame of the Week returns, for one night only!
U wot? Silicon Roundabout set to become Silicon U-BEND
Crap-spouting London upstarts to get permanent road closure
Hey, you, PHONE-FACE! Kickstarter in-car mobe mount will EMBED your phone into your MUG
Stick it on the steering wheel and wait for the airbag to fire
NEWSFLASH: It's time to ditch dullard Facebook chums
Everything hot in tech, courtesy of avian anchor Regina Eggbert
'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT
Plus: Anons are 'wannabes', KKK says, before being pwned
Criticism of Uber's journo-Data Analytics plan is an Attack on DIGITAL FREEDOM
First they came for Emil – and I'm damn well SPEAKING OUT
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Managing SSL certificates with ease
The lack of operational efficiencies and compliance pitfalls associated with poor SSL certificate management, and how the right SSL certificate management tool can help.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.