Brazilians to brew supercoffee

Genome cracked, kettle on

A breakthrough in genetic research could have huge implications for sysadmins the world over: boffins in Brazil have cracked the genome of the coffee bean.

As well as paving the way for a better understanding of why some coffee beans are naturally violent, and others are musically gifted, [Have you been overdoing the espressos again? - Ed] the Brazilian Agriculture Minister said that the discovery would be used to develop a super-coffee. The BBC reports that this super-coffee will be richer, more aromatic and resistant to disease.

Coffee is undeniably the sturdiest support of our new-found proto-technotopian age. Without it, server crashes would go untended, email would be unfiltered and no one would have the energy to code new games. Cola comes a close second.

Brazil already supplies a third of the world's coffee beans, making it the leading source by a significant margin. This research was given government backing two years ago, and will not be made available to competing coffee producers for another two years.

For those worried about mad white-coated scientists tinkering with DNA strands, relax. The Brazilians have some reassuring words: they plan to breed better coffee the old fashioned way: by cross pollination.

We think it sounds marvellous. Put the kettle on and clean out the cafetiere. All hail the Brazilian gods of caffeinated beverages... ®

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