Feeds

OpenGL 2.0 launched with built-in shader language

Pixel programming part of full spec.

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

OpenGL 2.0 was formally launched today and with it the completion of the graphics API's Shading Language specification for vertex- and pixel-shader programming.

OpenGL Shading Language was approved by the OpenGL Architecture Review Board (ARB) in June 2003 as an extension to OpenGL 1.4, which has since been updated to version 1.5.

The language was always destined to be integrated into the full OpenGL specification, and that's essentially what happened today. Next, graphics chip vendors have to offer OpenGL 2.0-capable drivers, allowing programmers to code using the new API in the sure and certain knowledge that their apps will run on the latest programmable pixel and vertex shaders from ATI, Nvidia, Intel and co.

And, indeed, both ATI and Nvidia were quick to voice their happiness that Shading Language has been wrapped into OpenGL and is no longer an optional add-on.

Programmable shader support remains OpenGL 2.0's key feature, but it's not the only one. The ARB have also included technology that enables support from multiple render targets in a single pass and to allow developers to apply rectangular rather than square, 'power of two' textures for all texture targets.

OpenGL 2.0 also adds support for point sprites, "which replace point texture coordinates with texture coordinates interpolated across the point". Essentially, points are treated as textures and textures as points, enabling some interesting particle effects.

The API now includes two-sided stencil support "with the ability to define stencil functionality for the front and back faces of primitives, improving performance of shadow volume and constructive solid geometry rendering algorithms". ®

Related stories

Bitboys offers next-gen mobile 3D chips
3D Labs open sources OpenGL HLSL compiler
3Dlabs pledges support for ATI's RenderMonkey HLSL
Carmack backs OpenGL in shader wars

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.