Feeds

Ofcom unshackles radio spectrum

Trading to begin by end 2004

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Ofcom, the communications industry’s regulator, has paved the way for radio spectrum licence trading to begin in the UK by the end of the year.

The regulatory body published a 100-page document outlining the planned liberalisation of spectrum trading. The new rules will mean spectrum owners will be able to sell frequencies to third parties, and use spectrum for purposes outside the terms of their licence agreements.

Ofcom said in a statement that: “Rather like land, nobody makes more spectrum. However, each country can make more of what it has.”

It argued that the traditional approach to spectrum management (Government controlled) meant the space on the airwaves was not being used as efficiently as possible. It also lacks flexibility; making it difficult for spectrum owners to use their frequencies in new ways.

Intellect, the IT trade association, welcomed the report. In a statement, Intellect’s director of campaigns, Tom Wills-Sandford, said: “Only by ensuring the maximum effective and imaginative use of the available radio spectrum will Ofcom pave the way for a greatly improved communications infrastructure, resulting in higher productivity levels and socio/economic success for the UK within the knowledge driven economy."

This first stage of liberalisation applies to eight licence classes: analogue public-access mobile radio, national paging, data networks, national and regional private business radio, common base stations, fixed wireless access, scanning telemetry and fixed terrestrial links.

Mobile operators will have to wait for trading in 2G and 3G spectrum to begin. Ofcom has pencilled in deregulation of this licence class for 2007, but stressed that nothing has been finalised. ®

Related stories

EC demands more wireless R&D
Erkki speaks on mobile regulations
EU hints at central takeover of radio spectrum licensing

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Google has spaffed more cash on lobbying this year than Big Cable
Don't worry, it'll be cheaper when they use drones
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?