Feeds

Brits still blind to benefits of Wi-Fi

So much for Intel's Centrino advertising

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

It's 17 months since Intel launched its Centrino and began telling the world about wireless networking - Apple (ahem) launched its first 802.11b product in 1999 - and still the majority of the UK public remain blissfully unaware what Wi-Fi is.

The chip giant today announced that its research - actually conducted by ICM Research - has revealed that 34 per cent of adults in the UK known the meaning of the term 'Wi-Fi'. This, the company feels, is impressive.

Alas a similar survey conducted exactly one year ago - this time put out by PC maker Packard Bell but conducted by Mori - found that only 30 per cent of UK adults know what Wi-Fi is.

In other words, only a further four per cent of the UK population over the age of 18 have hopped on board the hotspot 'revolution' in the last 12 months. Take into account the fact that different research companies have slightly different polling and statistical methodologies and you could argue that the figure really hasn't changed at all.

Certainly, then, as now, most Brits remain entirely out of range of the concept of wireless networking. This despite the fact that, according to Intel, "public hotspot infrastructure and usage has increased dramatically since Centrino mobile technology was launched in March 2003 [our italics]."

To be fair, the chip giant is at least trying to remedy this situation, by giving away 30 pages of extracts from Wi-Fi for Dummies to punters visiting any Dixons and PC World store.

Interestingly, Intel also notes that, according to researcher IDC, some 450,000 people will use a public Wi-Fi hotspot during 2004. Now since the UK's adult population is around 40m souls, that forecast amounts to roughly 1.15 per cent of the adult population - rather less than the 20 per cent who know what a hotspot is.

Clearly, Intel's ads showing allegedly live wireless webcam sessions taking place in Greek amphitheatres or half way up Annapurna just aren't getting the message across... ®

Related stories

70% of Brits don't know what a Wi-Fi hotspot is
Exeter dominates UK Wi-Fi scene - Intel
Vodafone finds mobile workforce
Report raps Wi-Fi providers for 'location inflation'
European workers take to the streets
Wi-Fi in the real world - pt. 2
Public Wi-Fi failing to attract road warriors
Businesses shun Wi-Fi, homes embrace it
UK corporates unconvinced by Wi-Fi

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Turnbull: NBN won't turn your town into Silicon Valley
'People have been brainwashed to believe that their world will be changed forever if they get FTTP'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.