Feeds

Sun targets HP-UX and Windows with software subs

Who needs Intel Inside?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Sun Microsystems has finalized a plan to put more pressure on rivals by porting its entire JES (Java Enterprise System) software line to the HP-UX and Windows operating systems.

Bits and pieces of JES - a package that includes an app server, directory server, clustering software and 11 other items - already run on Windows. Sun, however, has now vowed to have the whole enchilada running on Windows and HP-UX by January. This means customers with a mix of hardware can now pick up JES for $100 per employee on the majority of their gear. Sun has also tested parts of JES on AIX but has refused to confirm an IBM attack is in the works.

Sun has developed somewhat of a bad reputation for being late with software products, but the company assures us the JES package for HP-UX and Windows will be on time.

"The work has been going on for quite awhile," said Stephen Borcich, a JES marketing executive at Sun. "This is not an insurmountable task, and the work is well underway."

Sun insists that early JES customers pushed the company to support the HP and Microsoft operating systems. Sun has over 300,000 employees subscribed to the JES model thus far. The vast majority of these customers are running the software on Solaris for UltraSPARC, but Sun already offers JES for both Solaris x86 and Linux as well.

And to help push JES along, Sun has also announced a promotion where it will give new subscribers a free two-processor Opteron server and free copy of Solaris. Sun really gets excited about this particular promotion for reasons unknown. Free kit is always nice, but a $4,000 box isn't all that fantastic when you're already shelling out thousands upon thousands for JES. But, hey, the only servers other vendors give away are Itanium boxes, and who wants one of those?

Sun upgraded its Opteron server line yesterday, and Sun's volume server chief John Fowler vowed that all is going well on the x86 front.

Sun had initially planned to release the systems sooner, but pushed back the launch "to turn up" the volume of kit produced, Fowler said. Sun has shipped its V20z two-processor box to 324 different customers in 41 countries with financial services companies and telcos - Sun's bread and butter - being the most hungry buyers.

Sun is looking at some creative ways to drive higher margins on the x86 kit, Fowler said. Sun, for example, put an Opteron box signed by CEO Scott McNealy up for sale on eBay.

"We're testing a bunch of signatures to see which one can add the most margin," Fowler said.

We suggested that Sun recruit former chief scientist Bill Joy to write "The goo will get you" on a box, but Fowler laughed off this proposal.

Fowler refused to commit to delivering a system based on Intel's x86-64-bit Nocona processor.

"We are still evaluating that product, but will not be part of the main launch," he said.

Sun has been chided for not taking the x86 market seriously enough in the past, and ignoring Intel could be yet another misstep. Intel is a trusted name in the data center, unlike rival AMD which is trying to establish itself as a serious player with Opteron.

"We have just not found the Intel brand awareness to be worth a lot," Fowler said. "In fact, it's working the other way around. Customers are asking for Opteron." ®

Related stories

Sun salutes Microsoft for delivering Q4 profit
Sun gets liquored up on own code
Can Sun mature from Xeon boy to x86 man?

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests
Big Blue finds containers are speedy, but may not have much room to improve
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Gartner's Special Report: Should you believe the hype?
Enough hot air to carry a balloon to the Moon
Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp
Stats analysis reckons we'll hit that point in just three years
Dell The Man shrieks: 'We've got a Bitcoin order, we've got a Bitcoin order'
$50k of PowerEdge servers? That'll be 85 coins in digi-dosh
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.