Feeds

Verizon launches VoiceWing™ Net phones

WingedPigs™ to fly soon?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Verizon today announced the introduction of Internet phone calls in 134 area codes in the US. The VoiceWing VoIP service will be priced at $39.95 and requires a broadband data connection. But fear not, Verizon will happily sell you one of those through its DSL division, in which case you'll qualify for five bucks off the monthly tariff.

It follows hot on the heels of its rival, and former mothership, AT&T. AT&T completed the introduction ts first VoIP to 100 markets. Verizon is an amalgamation of (mostly) East Coast Baby Bells.

Verizon warns that the call quality will be equivalent to that found on the US cellphone network (ie, diabolically bad) and it can't guarantee that subscribers reach emergency services within a specified period, so it advises punters to keep a conventional circuit-switched phone around just in case of, um, emergencies.

So is there a market for it? Are there enough people who can pay north of $65 for their combined monthly landline tariffs and who can put up with terrible voice quality? Clearly this depends on how much they can save on calls, and how tolerant they are of the inconvenience. Until the call quality improves this could be limited to a group not much larger than today's radio hams. If and when it improves, things will start to get very interesting.

Analysts Mercer Consulting last month reminded VoIP providers to concentrate on improving call quality, rather than on whiz-bang features that only propeller heads could really appreciate.

Symbian founder Colly Myers recently described Skype here as a "magic trick" and a chimera, because it couldn't offer a global mass market service, and relied on hopeful tinkerers. Perhaps in respone to Verizon's new "VoiceWing" brand, the Skypes and Vonages could band together with some memorable that reflects their own chances of success. We suggest "WingedPig". ®

Related stories

Telecom future to look a lot like the past - study
US Net users want VoIP
US hardcore not interested in the Net
North Americans confused about VoIP

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.