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Nvidia NV43 spied on web

Even as ATI Radeon X800 GT details are posted

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Nvidia's NV43 graphics chip has made an appearance on the web, courtesy of a Chinese web site which claims to have got the snap off of a local graphics card maker.

If undoctored, the shot is of an engineering sample. According to a recent roadmap leak, NV43 will ship this autumn as a PCI Express native successor to the GeForce PCX 5750 and FX 5900, which suggests it's a lower-end 6800. The site reckons the part will offer eight or 12 pixel pipelines.

Meanwhile, another Chinese web site reckons ATI is preparing an alternative to Nvidia's 6800 GT part called, oddly enough, the Radeon X800 GT. The site says it will be a lower-clocked (425MHz) version of the X800 XT, running with 900MHz G-DDR 3 memory - 256MB of it. Derived from the XT, it will have 16 pixel pipelines, the report claims. ®

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