Feeds

Japanese to tag schoolkids

My first RFID

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Japanese primary school kids' bags will be tagged with RFID so that little darlings can be monitored on their way to and from school.

The telecoms ministry has announced that a primary school in Tabe, Wakayama Prefecture, will test the scheme which will log when kids pass through the gates and warn the school when they stray too close to locations deemed dangerous by staff and parents.

The project requires tag readers to be installed at the school and attached to any such undesirable locale outside. It remains to be seen if sweet shop owners will take kindly to RFID scanners clamped to their premises.

The system will offer parents the opportunity to receive updates regarding their offsprings' progress through the mean streets of Tabe via email or SMS. ®

Related stories

Vatican Library adopts RFID
Munich faces RFID-controlled congestion charge
US lubes passports with RFID snake oil
Barcelona nightclub chips customers
Tinfoil hats to retail with RFID tags?
German revolt against RFID

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.