Feeds

Linksys touts Wi-Fi signal boost upgrade

Replace your aerial - legally

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

Linksys has begun selling replacement antennae for its 801.11b and 802.11g base-stations in a bid to boost wireless network coverage.

Linksyst TNC high-gain antennaThe company is offering paired and single high-gain aerials aimed at its twin- and single-antenna access point products. All of them are designed to increase the strength of broadcast signals and raise the access point's sensitivity to incoming signals. The benefits are the ability to work at potentially greater distances from the client (or vice versa) and to shrink dead-zones within the coverage zone.

Linksys is offering a pair of TNC antennae and one SMA aerial, all of which connect to their respective access points in place of those already in place - just unscrew the existing antennae. The TNC pack is geared towards Linksys' WRT54GS, WRT54G, WAP54G, BEFW11S4 and WAP11 products. The SMA aerial to the company's WRV54G, WMP54GS, WMP54G and WET54G devices.

Interestingly, it's illegal in the US to use a wireless product with an alternative aerial, unless both parts have been certified together by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). According to Wi-Fi Networking News, Linksys went to the trouble of getting the FCC to certify all the antenna-access point combinations, in order to ensure its customers remain on the right side to the law.

Linksys itself is safe from prosecution - it's not illegal to sell alternative antennae, only to use them. Not that anyone's ever been nabbed for it, so far as we know.

Both packs cost $60, and are available now in the US and Canada. Linksys is also offering a pair of antenna stands for $30 a go. ®

Related stories

Cisco sued in Wi-Fi patent clash
Wireless kit sales on the up-and-up
Broadcom simplifies Wi-Fi security set-up
Wi-Fi devices not talking
Linksys falls off Wi-Fi bridge
Deutsche Telekom to unite 'half the world's Wi-Fi hotspots'

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
Canadian ISP Shaw falls over with 'routing' sickness
How sure are you of cloud computing now?
Don't call it throttling: Ericsson 'priority' tech gives users their own slice of spectrum
Actually it's a nifty trick - at least you'll pay for what you get
Three floats Jolla in Hong Kong: Says Sailfish is '3rd option'
Network throws hat into ring with Linux-powered handsets
Fifteen zero days found in hacker router comp romp
Four routers rooted in SOHOpelessly Broken challenge
New Sprint CEO says he will lower axe on staff – but prices come first
'Very disruptive' new rates to be revealed next week
PwC says US biz lagging in Internet of Things
Grass is greener in Asia, say the sensors
Ofcom sees RISE OF THE MACHINE-to-machine cell comms
Study spots 9% growth in IoT m2m mobile data connections
O2 vs Vodafone: Mobe firms grab for GCHQ, gov.uk security badge
No, the spooks love US best, say rival firms
Ancient pager tech SMS: It works, it's fab, but wow, get a load of that incoming SPAM
Networks' main issue: they don't know how it works, says expert
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.