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UK reseller unveils 'video iPod'

40GB MPEG 4/MP3/JPEG player comes to Blighty

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Reg Kit Watch UK mobile device supplier Peripheral Corner has launched what it claims is the "Swiss Army Knife of gadgets" - a hard drive-equipped portable video player, the PV-330.

The unit ships with up to 40GB of storage, ready for MP3 audio, MPEG 4 video and JPEG still photography to be pumped over from a host PC via USB 2.0. Playback comes courtesy of an on-board version of Real Networks' Real One Player. The PV-330 also contains 64MB of SDRAM for skip-free playback, and 2MB of Flash ROM.

PV-330 personal video playerContent can be displayed on the PV-330's 3.5in, 480 x 234 LCD, but it also sports an RCA jack allowing it to be hooked up to a TV. It also has its own video encoder, based on the G.726 codec, allowing the unit to be connected to a DVD player, VCR, TV or set-top box and to record programmes in 320 x 240 at 24-28fps straight to disk.

Audio can be recorded, too, both through the AV jacks and via a built-in microphone.

The PV-330 appears to the PC as a standard external hard drive, so it can be used as a storage device for other file-types, too. It also ships with a utility to convert PowerPoint files into JPEGs, allowing Peripheral Corner to pitch the device as a portable presentation tool. The unit ships with its own remote control.

The PV-330 weighs 350g and measures 13 x 8.4 x 3.3cm. Inside is a 1800mAh rechargeable Lithium Ion battery capable of delivering four hours' video playback.

Peripheral Corner is offering the 40GB PV-330 now for £382 including VAT. ®

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