Feeds

Aussie judge sets Kazaa trial date

If parties can agree on access to crucial evidence

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Kazaa parent Sharman Networks' battle with the music industry may finally come to trial in November, the Australian court cautiously ruled this week.

Sharman and representatives of Music Industry Piracy Investigations (MIPI), the Australian music industry's anti-piracy taskforce, returned to Justice Murray Wilcox's courtroom yesterday.

Judge Wilcox pencilled in a 29 November 2004 trial date, with discovery to be completed by October, after Sharman lawyer Robert Ellicott argued against an earlier discovery deadline of 13 August.

Ellicott also claimed that evidence seized from Sharman's premises may not be admissible, arguing that the raids undertaken by MIPI were in breach of Australia's Telecommunications Act.

The raids took place on 6 February 2004, and targeted Sharman's HQ and company executives' homes and a number of other Internet firms. MIPI had been granted Anton Piller orders authorising the raids, which were conducted to retrieve evidence of copyright infringement.

An Anton Pillar Order is a search and seize order, used in Australia and the UK, giving one party in a legal dispute the right to enter premises and search for evidence. The application is made without the knowledge of the party who is to be searched - the judge must be satisfied that material concerning the case would be destroyed unless secrecy was maintained.

Since Sharman's Anton Pillar raids, lawyers have attempted to have the orders deemed inappropriate and thus have the evidence seized thrown out of court. Judge Wilcox has allowed the orders to stand - Sharman is appealing against his ruling - but agreed that the evidence obtained should be sifted to remove any material nor pertinent to the terms of the order.

The parties have not agreed a procedure by which this review should be conducted, and this has continued to hold up the case since March this year.

Sharman wants to delay the case. It hopes that the US movie industry's appeal against a 2003 District Court ruling that liberates P2P networks from the acts of their users.

Indeed, Judge Wilcox dubbed Ellicott's latest argument as a "distraction". Ellicott maintained that during the raid, MIPI had breached the Telecommunications Act, which forbids the interception of a "communication" passing through a telecoms system. MIPI infringed the Act by taking "communications" from Sharman's routers before they were relayed to the company's computers, and it did so without making Sharman aware of the fact, he submitted.

Wilcox dismissed the argument, due to a lack of appropriate evidence and ruled the Ellicott's motion to have the Anton Piller evidence rejected to be unnecessary.

MIPI and Sharman must return to court on 16 July to report on the progress of their negotiations over how each should be granted access to the seized material. If no clear review procedure is in place, the trial could be delayed even further. ®

Related stories

Judge delays Kazaa case to clear up mess
Kazaa to appeal data seizure order ruling
Kazaa fails to overturn music biz data seizure orders
Kazaa trial judge delays hearing
Kazaa demands Oz trial delay
Music industry raids Kazaa's Australia HQ

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?