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JVC buys BIOS-based system testing tool

Ultra-X signs major vendor

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JVC has licensed Ultra-X's UltraPost embedded system diagnostics technology into its upcoming Interlink sub-notebook family. Pitched at system builders and OEMs, UltraPost resides in the host PC's BIOS - it takes up just 32KB - ready to be triggered at start-up. According to Ultra-X, the software runs "professional-level" tests taking in the CPU, mobo, memory, IDE drives, USB bus, Firewire/1394 ports, LAN and AGP.

It says the technology provides a better first-line of diagnosis when users call up with tech support issues. System suppliers can quickly ensure that problems are not the result of hardware malfunction, potentially saving the need to return undamaged PCs back to base.

JVC offers three InterLink notebooks aimed at the Japanese market: the XV and XP based on Windows XP, and the CE based on Windows Mobile for Handheld PCs. ®

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