Feeds

Intel prunes pre-Grantsdale P4 chipset prices

But 'unlikely' to boost i8x5 demand

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intel this week cut the prices of its i865 and i845 chipset families in a bid to boost demand after the launch of its top-end i915 and i925 series.

However, unnamed mobo maker sources cited by DigiTimes claim it's not going to work: there are just too many chipsets in the channel already.

Said sources suggest that inventory levels have reached a supply capacity of one month rather than the usual two-week backlog. That may not change significantly until the end of Q3, they say. June didn't see strong sales, although OEM demand for mobos is expected to pick up in July.

Intel's prices fell by up to 15 per cent, it is estimated, with the i845GE falling from $30 to $25.5; the i845GL, GV and PE dropping from $21 to $18.5; the i848P's price reset to $22 from $24; the i865GV falling from $27 to $25; and the i865PE dropping from $28 to $27. ®

Related stories

Intel preps i925XE chipset with gigahertz FSB
Intel shaves a buck off certain Centrinos
Intel recalls faulty Grantsdale chipsets
PC maker confirms 775-pin Celeron D
Tyan to ship Socket T mobos next quarter
Wi-Fi to come late to Grantsdale party
Review: Intel i915P, G and i925X chipsets

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?