Feeds

Fujitsu and Microsoft cement Itanium future

Making Windows mission critical

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Fujitsu has sweetened its relationship with Microsoft at the high end of the server market with the two companies announcing today a long range shared development plan.

Specifically, Fujitsu has turned to Microsoft for help tuning Windows Server 2003 and the future "Longhorn" Server OS on its Itanium-based servers. Fujitsu plans to roll out its first Itanium system running Windows Server 2003 in the first half of 2005. As part of that roll out, the two companies plan to team on various benchmarks and software porting efforts.

Fujtsu's Chairman Naoyuki Akikusa and Microsoft's CEO Steve Ballmer announced the deal in Tokyo.

"By combining Fujitsu's platform products and integration expertise with existing Windows assets, this expanded collaboration makes it possible to offer Windows-based systems with the most advanced level of mainframe-class reliability to customers who demand maximum system availability for their mission-critical systems," said Akikusa.

As Akikusa rightly points out, Microsoft can benefit from Fujitsu's mainframe and high-end server expertise. Despite years of trying to creep deeper into data centers, Microsoft remains a fringe player. Intel's Itanium processor, however, and backing from HP have strengthened Microsoft's competitive position against Unix vendors such as IBM and Sun Microsystems. That is unless you look at Itanium's sales, which once again take Microsoft back to ground zero.

To help push things along, Fujitsu plans to send a team of engineers over to Redmond. The staffers will work on OS performance tuning and improving the ways in which Fujitsu's management software works with Microsoft products. The end goal being a cocreated mission-critical type platform that businesses can rely on for very high-end functions.

By 2007, Fujitsu hopes to sell about $7.2bn in hardware and software as a result of the partnership.

Not to be forgotten is Fujitsu's recent deal with Sun in which it will supply Sun with processors from mid-2005 on. Both companies will also resell each others' SPARC-based servers.

Like IBM, Fujitsu is covering all the bases with its server gear. ®

Related stories

Sun slams Red Hat
Fujitsu unleashes 90nm SPARC64
Fujitsu Software gets serious outside of Japan
Sun sparks server tie up with Fujitsu

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.